Policy Briefs on THE

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF HIV

Impact of HIV

Brief 11: Domestic Public Funding for HIV

By Markus Haacker, Gesine Meyer-Rath

August 2021

Key Points

  • External funding has played an unusually large role in the financing of HIV programmes (compared with health or public spending overall), but the share of domestic financing has increased in recent years, especially in middle-income countries.
  • Decisions on funding allocations are made largely independently of tax policies, and domestic funding comes from the government’s general resource account. In this sense, there is no specific domestic funding for HIV, and the principal sources of additional resources for HIV and other purposes are increasing the tax base and improved public financial management.

  • HIV-specific financing instruments – in the form of trust funds and earmarked taxes, borrowing or “innovative” financing – have played a minor role in the financing of HIV programmes, and generally do not represent additional funding.
Download PDF HIV Impact

Technical Briefs

The technical briefs provide more detail on the evidence available on each of the topics.

1. The State of Programme Implementation to Reduce HIV Transmission & Aids-Related Mortality

2. Increased Health and Life Prospects and Their Economic Valuation

3. HIV, Population Dynamics and the Labour Force

4. Human Capital

5. Capital and Investment

6. Productivity and Employment of People Living with HIV

7. Economic Growth – Overview

8. Interactions Between HIV and Poverty

9. Disease Burden Across Population Sub-Groups

10. Trade-offs between Allocation to Health and Other Sectors

11. Domestic Public Funding for HIV

12. Trade-offs and Synergies between HIV and Other Health Objectives

13. Assessing Cost Effectiveness Across HIV and Health Interventions

14. External and Domestic Health Financing, and the Role of Public vs. Private Domestic Health Funding

15. Public and Private Provision of Health and HIV Services

16. Trade-offs within the HIV Budget

17. The Economics of HIV and of HIV Programmes in the Era of Covid-19

Brief 3: HIV, Population Dynamics and the Labour Force

By Markus Haacker, Kate Harris, Gesine Meyer-Rath

21 January 2021

Key Points

  • AIDS-related mortality among working-age adults reduces GDP growth but has an ambiguous effect on GDP per capita.

 

  • In the short run, population size decreases due to reduced fertility and increased child mortality owing to HIV, and GDP per capita increases, but this results in lower growth of the working-age population and of GDP in the long run.

 

  • A smaller elderly cohort due to HIV-related early mortality mitigates the fiscal burden of an ageing population, but as HIV treatment is scaled up, there is higher-than-normal growth of the old population.

 

  • The HIV response reverses most of the demographic impacts and results in higher growth of the working-age population, but reversals in the impact on the population structure play out over decades.
Download PDF HIV Impact

Technical Briefs

The technical briefs provide more detail on the evidence available on each of the topics.

1. The State of Programme Implementation to Reduce HIV Transmission & Aids-Related Mortality

2. Increased Health and Life Prospects and Their Economic Valuation

3. HIV, Population Dynamics and the Labour Force

4. Human Capital

5. Capital and Investment

6. Productivity and Employment of People Living with HIV

7. Economic Growth – Overview

8. Interactions Between HIV and Poverty

9. Disease Burden Across Population Sub-Groups

10. Trade-offs between Allocation to Health and Other Sectors

11. Domestic Public Funding for HIV

12. Trade-offs and Synergies between HIV and Other Health Objectives

13. Assessing Cost Effectiveness Across HIV and Health Interventions

14. External and Domestic Health Financing, and the Role of Public vs. Private Domestic Health Funding

15. Public and Private Provision of Health and HIV Services

16. Trade-offs within the HIV Budget

17. The Economics of HIV and of HIV Programmes in the Era of Covid-19

Wits Health Consortium, University of the Witwatersrand