Policy Briefs on the

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF HIV

Impact of HIV

Introduction

The “Economic Impact of HIV” project synthesises the evidence on the economic impact of HIV into a series of 17 policy briefs that can help decision makers in the ministries of finance and health in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) decide on the future financing of their country’s HIV programme. The project incorporates a series of webinars with an academic and LMIC government staff audience to refine the content and presentation of the briefs, the presentation of the evidence to LMIC decision makers during a comprehensive workshop, and the publication of the policy briefs here and via submissions to peer-reviewed journals.

Markus Haacker (University College London) and Gesine Meyer-Rath (HE²RO, University of the Witwatersrand/ Boston University) are the primary authors of the briefs, with additional input provided by Kate Harris (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation), Arjun Vasan (US Treasury), Stef Bertozzi (UCSF Berkeley), Lorna Tumwebaze (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation), and attendants of the webinars representing academic institutions, governments from low- and middle-income countries, and non-state actors. The project was funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The views and opinions expressed in the webinars and the policy briefs do however not necessarily reflect the positions or policies of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Technical Briefs

The technical briefs provide more detail on the evidence available on each of the topics.

1. The State of Programme Implementation to Reduce HIV Transmission & Aids-Related Mortality

2. Increased Health and Life Prospects and Their Economic Valuation

3. HIV, Population Dynamics and the Labour Force

4. Human Capital

5. Capital and Investment

6. Productivity and Employment of People Living with HIV

7. Economic Growth – Overview

8. Interactions Between HIV and Poverty

9. Disease Burden Across Population Sub-Groups

10. Trade-offs between Allocation to Health and Other Sectors

11. Domestic Public Funding for HIV

12. Trade-offs and Synergies between HIV and Other Health Objectives

13. Assessing Cost Effectiveness Across HIV and Health Interventions

14. External and Domestic Health Financing, and the Role of Public vs. Private Domestic Health Funding

15. Public and Private Provision of Health and HIV Services

16. Trade-offs within the HIV Budget

17. The Economics of HIV and of HIV Programmes in the Era of Covid-19

Introduction

The “Economic Impact of HIV” project synthesises the evidence on the economic impact of HIV into a series of 17 policy briefs that can help decision makers in the ministries of finance and health in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) decide on the future financing of their country’s HIV programme. The project incorporates a series of webinars with an academic and LMIC government staff audience to refine the content and presentation of the briefs, the presentation of the evidence to LMIC decision makers during a comprehensive workshop, and the publication of the policy briefs here and via submissions to peer-reviewed journals.

Markus Haacker (University College London) and Gesine Meyer-Rath (HE2RO, University of the Witwatersrand/ Boston University) are the primary authors of the briefs, with additional input provided by Kate Harris (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation), Arjun Vasan (US Treasury), Stef Bertozzi (UCSF Berkeley) Lorna Tumwebaze (Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation), and attendants of the webinars representing academic institutions, governments from low- and middle-income countries, and non-state actors. The project was funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The views and opinions expressed in the webinars and the policy briefs do however not necessarily reflect the positions or policies of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Technical Briefs

The technical briefs provide more detail on the evidence available on each of the topics.

1. The State of Programme Implementation to Reduce HIV Transmission & Aids-Related Mortality

2. Increased Health and Life Prospects and Their Economic Valuation

3. HIV, Population Dynamics and the Labour Force

4. Human Capital

5. Capital and Investment

6. Productivity and Employment of People Living with HIV

7. Economic Growth – Overview

8. Interactions Between HIV and Poverty

9. Disease Burden Across Population Sub-Groups

10. Trade-offs between Allocation to Health and Other Sectors

11. Domestic Public Funding for HIV

12. Trade-offs and Synergies between HIV and Other Health Objectives

13. Assessing Cost Effectiveness Across HIV and Health Interventions

14. External and Domestic Health Financing, and the Role of Public vs. Private Domestic Health Funding

15. Public and Private Provision of Health and HIV Services

16. Trade-offs within the HIV Budget

17. The Economics of HIV and of HIV Programmes in the Era of Covid-19

Wits Health Consortium, University of the Witwatersrand